Western sources: head of Egyptian intelligence visited several countries , established front against Turkey

The British newspaper "Arab Weekly" revealed that the head of the Egyptian General Intelligence Service, Abbas Kamel, visited secretly several countries in the Middle East and North Africa, for forming an international coalition against the Turkish movements. He succeeded in establishing  a joint operations room for encountering  the Turkish plan.

The British newspaper, "Al Arab Weekly" revealed that the head of the Egyptian General Intelligence Service, Abbas Kamel, visited secretly several countries in the Middle East and North Africa in recent days to discuss the Turkish movements.

Kamel's meetings, according to the newspaper's report, which quoted unnamed sources, aim to establish an intelligence alliance between Egypt and other countries, and pave the way for closer military cooperation that would oppose Turkey's increasing aggressive actions in the region.

It said Kamel described Turkey's plans as "the most dangerous for the Arab region since Turkish President, Recep Tayyip Erdogan took power."

The sources said that Kamel provided highly sensitive information about the Turkish activities in Libya and Syria and the related developments to Turkey's military presence in Qatar and the African Horn.

Egypt's top intelligence official discussed sensitive information about Turkey's strategy in the Middle East and Africa and its new plans to deploy military intelligence, it said. "One of Turkey's immediate objectives is to develop more domestic agents and human intelligence assets to expand Ankara's influence and influence in future negotiations with Europeans, Russians, and Americans," it said.

It is  said that Kamel has achieved one key goal of his tour: reaching an agreement on a high-level "joint operating room" involving high-level representatives of the security agencies in countries which are interested in combating the plan.

The sources did not disclose the names of the countries that Kamel visited, but said that many expressed similar doubts about Ankara's tactics, and their willingness to contribute to any coordinated effort that would prevent any Turkish military increase in the region.

ANHA

 


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