​​​​​​​In Turkey, whoever confesses truth is killed by intelligence

Judicial documents released by "Nordic Monitor" showed shocking confessions of Colonel Furat Alakush who worked in the intelligence department of the Turkish Special Forces Command in his testimony before the court, including the assassination of a senior officer who revealed Qatari support for mercenaries in Syria via Turkey.

Judicial documents published by the website "Nordic Monitor," based in the Swedish capital Stockholm, are part of the conflicts taking place in the corridors of the Turkish security services, especially among intelligence officers.

The documents confirmed Qatar's involvement in supporting the mercenaries in Syria via Turkey, as well as Ankara's involvement in oil purchase deals from ISIS mercenaries who used to control large parts of northern Syria.

The documents showed shocking confessions of Colonel Furat Alakush who worked in the Intelligence Department of the Turkish Special Forces Command, in his testimony before the court, including the assassination of a senior officer who revealed Qatari support for the mercenaries in Syria via Turkey.

Alakush disclosed in his affidavit testimony before the Criminal Court of the 17th Circuit in the capital Ankara on March 20, 2019 that the General Zakai Aksakali, the Head of the Special Forces Command at the time ordered the assassination of Brigadier General Samih Terzi because the latter discovered that Aksakali was secretly working with the Turkish National Intelligence Service in managing illegal and undercover operations in Syria for personal gain, which dragged Turkey into the war quagmire there.

According to the Turkish judicial documents that include Alakush confessions, Brigadier Terzi knew the amount of funding that Qatar delivered to Turkey to buy weapons and ammunition for mercenaries in Syria, the most important of which is ISIS, how much of this money was actually delivered to the mercenaries, and how much it was embezzled by Turkish officials.

Alakush pointed out in his confessions that the Qatari case is only one example of how to channel money illegally, stressing that there are other countries whose money was embezzled after being transferred to Turkey under the pretext of "supporting Syrian armed opposition groups."

Alakush added that Brigadier General Terzi knew all the "dirty transactions" of the Turkish intelligence, speaking of "a gang in the Turkish army led by Aksakali who was working for its own account, away from any mandate from the senior officers of the General Staff."

He stressed that Terzi's knowledge of all these secrets had prompted Aksakali to give orders to execute Terzi who was summoned to Ankara from a border province on the pretext of providing him with security at the headquarter from a terrorist threat in the Turkish capital.

Alakush said that Terzi was aware of the names of those involved in the Turkish government in the smuggling of oil from Syria to Turkey through deals with ISIS mercenaries, and how the profits were shared, as well as other suspicious activities involving state officials.

According to Alakush's testimony before the court, the documents revealed his knowledge of the activities of some government officials who had brought top leaders of terrorist groups to receive treatment in Turkey, in exchange for bribes they paid to Turkish officials.

According to Colonel Alakush's testimony, the Turkish General Staff assigned Brigadier Terzi to work on the Syria file, and he knew all the details of the operations that the Turkish government was carrying out across the border.

Terzi was also in charge of a military base located in the border province of Kilis in southeastern Turkey, and among his responsibilities was to coordinate actions with the Turkish National Intelligence Service led by Hakan Fidan who is close to President Recep Tayyip Erdogan.

Terzi worked on a program in cooperation with the U.S. Department of Defense to train fighters from the "Syrian opposition", but he objected after he noticed that the intelligence service was trying to integrate militants in the program and considered it a deception, which made him the target by intelligence and Aksakali.

D.H


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